What if....the students complain that the puppest aren't real? / Qué hacer si un alumno dice "¡No es real!"

All the students (apart from the really young ones) realise that the puppets aren’t real and are more than happy to play along with the ‘game’ of make believe. Occasionally a student will say, often in an outraged manner “That swan's not real ”. Truth be told, this doesn’t happen that often, probably because I treat the puppets as if they are real. I take care never say that they are real - as this can then set up a challenge to the student to prove that the puppet isn’t real.

I call them puppets and/or refer to them as ‘my friends’ or by their names and hope that the student buys into the story/activity, which they normally do. This is especially important for very young learners otherwise they'll interrupt your story wanting to know if the puppet is real or not. If the student still continues to point out that that the swan/monkey (or whatever you’re working with) isn’t real, which they sometimes do, even though they've been told various times, there are a couple of ways you can deal with this. One way is to say “I know it’s a puppet, you know it’s a puppet, but let’s pretend it’s real and we’ll have fun” or I cover the puppet’s ears and say in a conspiratorial way “I know she’s a puppet, you know she’s a puppet... but she doesn’t know she’s a puppet”. Your students need to see you playing and having fun too.

Todos los alumnos (excepto los muy pequeños) se dan cuenta de que los títeres no son reales, pero están encantados de entrar en el juego y participar en él. Sin embargo, en ocasiones, alguno de ellos dice "¡Este cisne no es de verdad!". (No suele ocurrir muy a menudo porque trato a los títeres como si fueran de verdad. Nunca digo que lo sean, pero me refiero a ellos como mis amigos o por sus nombres). Si esto pasa, dependiendo del niño, uno puede responder: "Sé que es un títere, tú también lo sabes, pero vamos a fingir que es real y a pasárnoslo bien todos juntos", o bien tapo las orejas del títere y digo, en tono conspirativo: "Ya sé que es un títere, y que tú también lo sabes, pero ella no lo sabe". Tu clase debe saber que tú estás jugando y pasándotelo bien también.

 

One student in this group was quick to point out that it wasn't a real swan...though quickly forgotten as he was so engaged in the story. Note the line of masking tape on the floor - this is to give me some space, as they get engrossed in the story, the students tend to move closer and closer towards you until they're practically on top of you.

One student in this group was quick to point out that it wasn't a real swan...though quickly forgotten as he was so engaged in the story. Note the line of masking tape on the floor - this is to give me some space, as they get engrossed in the story, the students tend to move closer and closer towards you until they're practically on top of you.